B.A.A. History

Boston Athletic Association: Established March 15, 1887

historical

Among the nation's oldest athletic clubs, the Boston Athletic Association was established on March 15, 1887 under its first president, Robert F. Clark, and with the support of leading sports enthusiasts, entrepreneurs and politicians of the day. According to Article II of the B.A.A.'s 1890 Yearbook Constitution, their objective was to "encourage all manly sports and promote physical culture."

In 1888, the B.A.A. completed its magnificent clubhouse in Boston's Back Bay on the corner of Exeter and Boylston Streets, on the present-day site of the new Boston Public Library. In addition to such facilities as a gymnasium, bowling alley, billiard hall, Turkish baths and tennis courts, the Association also owned a shooting range and a country club. Active sports of the day included boxing, fencing, water polo, and athletics.

The club held its first organized track and field competition in 1890. The Association chose a mythical unicorn as its symbol, which remains on the Boston Marathon medals to this day.

Ten years after it was established, the B.A.A. held the 24.5-mile B.A.A. Road Race to conclude the B.A.A. Games, a springtime athletic competition. The Boston Marathon, as the race would later become known, was held on April 19, 1897 with a starting field of 15 runners. Ten participants finished the inaugural run, which began in Ashland, Mass., and the race to Boston has been held in every subsequent year. In addition to its indisputable position as the world’s oldest annual marathon, “Boston” is widely regarded as one of the world’s most prestigious road races. The Boston Marathon is held on Patriots’ Day (third Monday in April). The centennial Boston Marathon was on April 15, 1996 and drew one of the world’s largest field of finishers (35,868).

In 1936, the clubhouse closed due to financial hardship. The Boston Athletic Association is now headquartered at 40 Trinity Place. In 1986, John Hancock Financial Services Inc. assumed the sponsorship of the Boston Marathon and saw the race into the next millennium.

The B.A.A. continues to rely on the generous support of John Hancock and other sponsors and contributors not only with its signature event, the Boston Marathon, but also in its year-round community programming.

Contact Info:
Boston Office (Administration)
185 Dartmouth Street
6th floor
Boston MA 02116
phone:617-236-1652
fax:617-236-4505
e-mail:info@baa.org
Hopkinton Office (Registration)
“The Starting Line”/One Ash St.
Hopkinton MA 01748
phone:508-435-6905
fax:508-435-6590
e-mail:info@baa.org
B.A.A. Moment 4

1935 John A. Kelley

Born in West Medford, Massachusetts as one of ten children, Kelley ran track and cross-country at Arlington High School in Massachusetts. He did not finish his first Boston Marathon in 1928, but eventually competed in a record 61 Boston Marathons. A legend of the marathon, Kelley won the 1935 and 1945 runnings of the Boston Marathon. He finished in second place at Boston a record seven times. Between 1934 to 1950, he finished in the top five 15 times at Boston, consistently running in the 2:30s. He ran his last full marathon at Boston in 1992 at the age of 84, his 61st start and 58th finish there.