FAQ

Contact Info:
Boston Office (Administration)
185 Dartmouth Street
6th floor
Boston MA 02116
phone:617-236-1652
fax:617-236-4505
e-mail:info@baa.org
Hopkinton Office (Registration)
One Ash Street
Hopkinton MA 01748
phone:508-435-6905
fax:508-435-6590
e-mail:registration@baa.org

Frequently Asked Questions

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A:

The ONLY guaranteed way to get to the start in Hopkinton on race morning is by using the official B.A.A. buses between 6:00 a.m. and 9:33 a.m. Bus loading will take place at the Tremont Street side of Boston Common in Boston’s Back Bay area. Transportation to the start is for official runners only. Each runner must show his/her bib number upon boarding. We are not able to provide transportation to the start from Boston for family or friends. You must show your race number upon boarding.

More information on the transportation system for the Boston Marathon will be forthcoming.

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Historically, runners who beat their qualifying standard by a larger amount of time are more likely to be accepted into the Boston Marathon. Since our rolling registration procedure was introduced in 2012, a cutoff has occurred 3 times:

  • Due to the high volume of applicants in 2012, the acceptance cutoff was drawn at 74 seconds. 
  • In 2013, we were able to accept all qualified runners who registered during the qualified registration period, so there was no cutoff time. 
  • In 2014, the cutoff for qualifying times was drawn at those who beat their qualifying standard by 98 seconds or faster.
  • The cutoff for the 2015 Boston Marathon was drawn at 62 seconds. 

Although these were the cases for previous years, we cannot predict how competitive the registration process will be for any given year, or how quickly it will fill. If you don’t have a qualifying time but still wish to participate, you can apply to run of one of the B.A.A. official charities by contacting them directly. Click the button below for more information:

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Unfortunately, Boston Marathon bib numbers and entry fees cannot be refunded. Regrettably, we do not allow deferment of race entry to another year. Runner bib numbers cannot be transferred to another participant, and you may not give your number to someone else. The Boston Marathon is a top-level sporting competition, and the B.A.A. seeks to uphold the integrity of both its entrants list and field and the results and awards reports and rankings.

Refunds or deferments of bib numbers for the Boston Marathon will not be granted for any reason, including injury, pregnancy, military exercise or deployment, and family emergencies. We regret that we cannot make exceptions.

For active duty military deployments to war zones, deferment of qualifying times will be honored for a later race. However, there will be no refund or deferment of bib numbers or entry fee. The B.A.A. appreciates the understanding from all who ask this question of the race organization, and we appreciate the cooperation in upholding the policies that are in place.

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Free shuttle services, the MBTA, and our drop-off/pick-up location are your best bet. There will be no parking at the event location. Parking in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood is extremely limited, but some spots along the street may be available. For more details on our transportation program, click the button below:

More Information - Click Here

 

A:

The 13.1-mile, rolling course is an out-and-back route that runs along the Emerald Necklace park system.

  • The B.A.A. Half Marathon will begin and end at White Stadium in Boston’s Franklin Park. The park, one of the oldest in America, is located in Boston’s Jamaica Plain and Dorchester neighborhoods.
  • With a start on Pierpont Road, the course proceeds out of Franklin Park, over the Monsignor William Casey Overpass, and past the Arnold Arboretum and Jamaica Pond as The Arborway becomes The Jamaicaway.
  • The course then passes Willow Pond and Olmsted Park, before the turn-around-point on The Riverway 4.75 miles into the race.
  • On the return, runners hug the western side of the Emerald Necklace, with Leverett Pond, and Jamaica Pond now on the left.
  • The race re-enters Franklin Park and loops around animal enclosures in the Franklin Park Zoo, before finishing on the track in White Stadium.

For more information, and to view the course map (including an elevation chart), click the button below:

A:

The average temperature at the start of the Boston Marathon ranges from 45-50 degrees F. The spread of temperature throughout the race can average approximately 25 degrees F, meaning the finish line temperature can average from 70-75 degrees F. However, in years past, there have been examples of extreme weather at the Boston Marathon. See below for examples:

Snow

  • 1907 Traces of sleet
  • 1908 Snowflakes and drizzle
  • 1925 Cold wind and occasional snowflakes
  • 1961 Snow squalls driven by winds of 10–12 mph; recorded temperature was 39 degrees
  • 1967 Snow squalls accompanied the runners through the first five miles.

Driving Rain

  • 1970 Mix of rain and sleet; temperatures in the high 30s;
  • 2007 Rain; winds gusting 25-30 mph; temperatures in the mid 40s.

Extreme Heat or Unseasonable Warmth

  • 1905 The temperature was reported to have reached the 100-degree mark.
  • 1909 The temperature soared to 97 degrees.
  • 1915 Reports of “intense heat.”
  • 1927 With the temperature reaching 84 degrees, a newly surfaced, yet uncured, road melted under the runners’ shoes.
  • 1931 Reports of “terrific heat” that “spelled ruin to the hopes of countless ambitious runners.”
  • 1952 The temperature rose to the upper 80s, with a high of 88 degrees.
  • 1958 The temperature climbed to 84 degrees.
  • 1976 For much of the first half of the race, the temperature along the course was reported to be 96 degrees.
  • 1987 The temperature was in the mid/upper 80s and the humidity was more than 95 percent.
  • 2004 The hottest marathon since 1976 (86 degrees at the finish) caused a record number of heat-related illnesses.
  • 2012 The temperature reached 75 degrees by the start of the Women's Elite field (9:30 a.m.), with a high of 89 degrees reported in Framingham (10K mark) by mid-day.
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For qualifying information on the Boston Marathon, please click the button below:

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Qualifying information for Athletes with Disabilities wishing to compete in the the Boston Marathon can be found using the button below:

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The B.A.A. will broadcast every five kilometer split to its website and family and friends can track your progress by logging in and entering your name or bib number. The "face" of the Boston Marathon website will change on race day and the process on how to enter the search will be clear. The AT&T Athlete Alert program allows messages to be automatically delivered to any US mobile phone, a pager, or any email address.

Alerts will be broadcast when your runner crosses the starting line, reaches the 10K, half marathon and 30K marks, and from the finish line. Runners or their family and friends can register in three ways:

  • Via text message or SMS, (after registering, you'll receive a text message confirming how to complete registration).
  • Visiting the AT&T Athlete Alert Sign-Up page at the race website, www.baa.org, and sign up there.
  • Registering in person. Representatives will be available in the Bib Number Pick-up area at the John Hancock Sports & Fitness Expo.
A:

Poland Spring Water and Gatorade Endurance Formula are the official fluids provided approximately every mile along the course as well as the start and finish areas.

B.A.A. Moment 3

1966 - Bobbi Gibb

Although not an official entrant, Roberta “Bobbi” Gibb became the first woman to run the Boston Marathon. Joining the starting field shortly after the gun had been fired, Gibb finished the race in 3:21:40 to place 126th overall. Gibb again claimed the “unofficial” title in 1967 and 1968.