FAQ

Contact Info:
Boston Office (Administration)
185 Dartmouth Street
6th floor
Boston MA 02116
phone:617-236-1652
fax:617-236-4505
e-mail:info@baa.org
Hopkinton Office (Registration)
“The Starting Line”/One Ash St.
Hopkinton MA 01748
phone:508-435-6905
fax:508-435-6590
e-mail:info@baa.org

Frequently Asked Questions

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A:

The 13.1-mile, rolling course combines both a looped and out-and-back route, beginning and ending near White Stadium (also known as Schoolboy Stadium) in Boston's Franklin Park. Past participants in the B.A.A. Half Marathon should note this important change. Essentially, the course has been flipped from past years. From Franklin Park, the race heads North to the Forest Hills Overpass and the Arborway, running adjacent to the Arnold Arboretum. The course turns right at Pond Street and continues North-bound onto the Jamaicaway (which becomes the Riverway), along Jamaica Pond and the other ponds and waterways that comprise Boston's Emerald Necklace. As the Riverway intersects with the Fenway, the race reverses direction with two left turns that sends runners South-bound on the Riverway.

After crossing over Huntington Avenue via overpass, there's a sharp right turn onto River Road in Brookline, followed by a sharp left turn onto Pond Ave. As the course hugs the western border of the Emerald Necklace, it turns left on Francis Parkman Drive, and then turns right on the Arborway and heads back adjacent to the Arboretum, over the Forest Hills Overpass, and into Franklin Park on Franklin Park Drive. In Franklin Park, the race turns right on Circuit Drive/N Jewish War Veterans Drive, and continues in a southward direction into the park for about a mile, before a hairpin turn reverses the course back on the same road.

The course passes the entrance/exit to the park on the left, and continues northward on Circuit Drive/N Jewish War Veterans Drive towards the Franklin Park Zoo. After a right turn on Pierpont Road, the race enters the Zoo for a quick counter-clockwise loop, and exits with a right turn onto Pierpont. Just before Pierpont intersects with Seaver Street, the course cuts across the park in a Western direction and turns right onto Playstead Road, before a finish near White Stadium. Please note that the course will remain open for two hours, 30 minutes after the start. Participants unable to complete the race within that time period will be asked to finish the race on the sidewalk. Timing will conclude 2:30:00 after the start. Go to map of the course.

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The average temperature at the start of the Boston Marathon ranges from 45-50 degrees F. The spread of temperature throughout the race can average approximately 25 degrees F, meaning the finish line temperature can average from 70-75 degrees F. However, in years past, there have been examples of extreme weather at the Boston Marathon. See below for examples:

Snow

  • 1907 Traces of sleet
  • 1908 Snowflakes and drizzle
  • 1925 Cold wind and occasional snowflakes
  • 1961 Snow squalls driven by winds of 10–12 mph; recorded temperature was 39 degrees
  • 1967 Snow squalls accompanied the runners through the first five miles.

Driving Rain

  • 1970 Mix of rain and sleet; temperatures in the high 30s;
  • 2007 Rain; winds gusting 25-30 mph; temperatures in the mid 40s.

Extreme Heat or Unseasonable Warmth

  • 1905 The temperature was reported to have reached the 100-degree mark.
  • 1909 The temperature soared to 97 degrees.
  • 1915 Reports of “intense heat.”
  • 1927 With the temperature reaching 84 degrees, a newly surfaced, yet uncured, road melted under the runners’ shoes.
  • 1931 Reports of “terrific heat” that “spelled ruin to the hopes of countless ambitious runners.”
  • 1952 The temperature rose to the upper 80s, with a high of 88 degrees.
  • 1958 The temperature climbed to 84 degrees.
  • 1976 For much of the first half of the race, the temperature along the course was reported to be 96 degrees.
  • 1987 The temperature was in the mid/upper 80s and the humidity was more than 95 percent.
  • 2004 The hottest marathon since 1976 (86 degrees at the finish) caused a record number of heat-related illnesses.
  • 2012 The temperature reached 75 degrees by the start of the Women's Elite field (9:30 a.m.), with a high of 89 degrees reported in Framingham (10K mark) by mid-day.
A:

The B.A.A. will broadcast every five kilometer split to its website and family and friends can track your progress by logging in and entering your name or bib number. The "face" of the Boston Marathon website will change on race day and the process on how to enter the search will be clear. The AT&T Athlete Alert program allows messages to be automatically delivered to any US mobile phone, a pager, or any email address.

Alerts will be broadcast when your runner crosses the starting line, reaches the 10K, half marathon and 30K marks, and from the finish line. Runners or their family and friends can register in three ways:

  • Via text message or SMS, (after registering, you'll receive a text message confirming how to complete registration).
  • Visiting the AT&T Athlete Alert Sign-Up page at the race website, www.baa.org, and sign up there. (This will be posted in March, 2015).
  • Registering in person. Representatives will be available in the Bib Number Pick-up area at the John Hancock Sports & Fitness Expo.
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For qualifying information on the Boston Marathon, please click the button below:

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Poland Spring Water and Gatorade Endurance Formula (lemon/lime flavor) are the official fluids provided approximately every mile along the course as well as the start and finish areas.

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No headquarters hotel has been designated for participants, but participants may find it convenient to stay in Boston's Back Bay neighborhood, which is where the race finishes.
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Poland Spring water, Gatorade, PowerBar, light refreshments, entertainment, tenting and portable toilets will be provided in the Village. Only official runners and volunteers will be allowed to enter the Village.

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The registration fee for the 2015 Boston Marathon for qualifiers is $175 USD for United States residents and $225 USD for international residents.

B.A.A. Moment 3

1966 - Bobbi Gibb

Although not an official entrant, Roberta “Bobbi” Gibb became the first woman to run the Boston Marathon. Joining the starting field shortly after the gun had been fired, Gibb finished the race in 3:21:40 to place 126th overall. Gibb again claimed the “unofficial” title in 1967 and 1968.