FAQ

Contact Info:
Boston Office (Administration)
185 Dartmouth Street
6th floor
Boston MA 02116
phone:617-236-1652
fax:617-236-4505
e-mail:info@baa.org
Hopkinton Office (Registration)
“The Starting Line”/One Ash St.
Hopkinton MA 01748
phone: 508-435-6905
fax: 508-435-6590
e-mail: registration@baa.org

Frequently Asked Questions

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A:

All finishers will receive a B.A.A. Half Marathon medal.

Prize money will be awarded equally to men and women, based on gun time. Top finishers in the open, masters, team, and push rim wheelchair divisions will receive prize money from a total purse of nearly $40,000.

You can find more information here: Prize Money

From 1st to 10th place, prizes are respectively as follows: $6,000, $4,000, $2,500, $1,500, $1000, $800, $600, $500, $400, $300.

Prizes for the top three athletes in the Master's Division (40-and-older) are: 1st: $300 2nd: $200 3rd: $100

Awards for the top three athletes in the Push Rim Wheelchair Division are: 1st: $500 2nd: $300 3rd: $200 Handcycle participants are not eligible to receive prize money awards in the push rim wheelchair division.

Awards will be presented to the top five finishers overall and top three push rim wheelchair division finishers, along with the first, second and third place finishers in the following age groups for both men and women: 14-19, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-79, and 80+.

Participants who complete the course will receive a specially designed finisher's medal.

A:

Stop for assistance and direction at one of the 26 Red Cross aid stations along the course. Sweep buses pick up runners at every Red Cross station with drop-off at the finish area medical tent. Aid stations along the course close at staggered times during the day. Finish area facilities officially close six hours after the last runner crosses the start line in Hopkinton. (About 6:00 p.m.)

A:

Just keep moving forward!

 We'll get you your medal at the same time we get you your mylar blanket, water, and other post-race refreshments.

A:

The average temperature at the start of the Boston Marathon ranges from 45-50 degrees F. The spread of temperature throughout the race can average approximately 25 degrees F, meaning the finish line temperature can average from 70-75 degrees F. However, in years past, there have been examples of extreme weather at the Boston Marathon. See below for examples:

Snow

  • 1907 Traces of sleet
  • 1908 Snowflakes and drizzle
  • 1925 Cold wind and occasional snowflakes
  • 1961 Snow squalls driven by winds of 10–12 mph; recorded temperature was 39 degrees
  • 1967 Snow squalls accompanied the runners through the first five miles.

Driving Rain

  • 1970 Mix of rain and sleet; temperatures in the high 30s;
  • 2007 Rain; winds gusting 25-30 mph; temperatures in the mid 40s.

Extreme Heat or Unseasonable Warmth

  • 1905 The temperature was reported to have reached the 100-degree mark.
  • 1909 The temperature soared to 97 degrees.
  • 1915 Reports of “intense heat.”
  • 1927 With the temperature reaching 84 degrees, a newly surfaced, yet uncured, road melted under the runners’ shoes.
  • 1931 Reports of “terrific heat” that “spelled ruin to the hopes of countless ambitious runners.”
  • 1952 The temperature rose to the upper 80s, with a high of 88 degrees.
  • 1958 The temperature climbed to 84 degrees.
  • 1976 For much of the first half of the race, the temperature along the course was reported to be 96 degrees.
  • 1987 The temperature was in the mid/upper 80s and the humidity was more than 95 percent.
  • 2004 The hottest marathon since 1976 (86 degrees at the finish) caused a record number of heat-related illnesses.
  • 2012 The temperature reached 75 degrees by the start of the Women's Elite field (9:30 a.m.), with a high of 89 degrees reported in Framingham (10K mark) by mid-day.
A:

Official Entrants receive:

  • Admission to the John Hancock Sports & Fitness Expo
  • Long sleeved t-shirt
  • Bib number
  • An official result from an electronically recorded official timing system
  • Runner’s gear check (click here for more information)
  • Boston Marathon Official Program
  • Complimentary ticket for the Pre-Race Pasta Dinner
  • Complimentary transportation to the start
  • Access to the Athletes’ Village in Hopkinton, providing entertainment, light refreshments, Poland Spring water, Gatorade Endurance Formula, PowerBar, bagels, tenting, and portable toilets.
  • Water and Gatorade Endurance Formula (lemon/lime flavor) along the course
  • First aid / medical facilities along the course and at the finish area
  • Athlete tracking
  • A finisher’s medal upon finishing the marathon before 6:10 p.m.
  • Baggage and dressing area (no showers)
  • Massage
  • Family meeting area
  • Admission to the Awards Ceremony
  • Complimentary ticket for the Post-Race Party
  • Results postcard providing all 5km split information, official and net times
  • Finisher’s certificate (mailed during the summer)
  • Results book (mailed over the summer)
A:

No, please do not run if you have not been officially entered in the race. Race amenities along the course and at the finish, such as fluids, medical care, and traffic safety, are provided based on the number of official entrants. Any addition to this by way of unofficial participants, adversely affects our ability to ensure a safe race for everyone.

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Just keep moving through the finish area. Your medal will be awarded to you with your water and post-race refreshments.

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JetBlue is the official airline for the Boston Marathon. To get special rates, please make your reservations through Marathon Tours. Email or call 800-444-4097, or 617-242-7845.
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The B.A.A. 10K is on Sunday, June 23, 2013. 

For full details, click here.

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We are able to provide transportation to the start from Boston to Hopkinton for officially registered runners only. There is no public transportation to Hopkinton.
B.A.A. Moment 5

1977 - Bob Hall Becomes the First Person to Complete the Race in a Wheelchair

Shown here in 1977, Bob Hall pioneered the division when he became the first person to complete the race in a wheelchair in 1975, making good on his promise to finish in under three hours.