FAQ

Contact Info:
Boston Office (Administration)
185 Dartmouth Street
6th floor
Boston MA 02116
phone:617-236-1652
fax:617-236-4505
e-mail:info@baa.org
Hopkinton Office (Registration)
One Ash Street
Hopkinton MA 01748
phone:508-435-6905
fax:508-435-6590
e-mail:registration@baa.org

Frequently Asked Questions

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A:

Your qualifying time is based on your age on the day of the Boston Marathon, thus your qualifying standard will be 3hrs 25 min - and you can be 44 when you run your qualifying race.

For more information on qualifying times, click here

A:

Awards are presented to the top 10 men and women overall, and the top three men and women in the 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-79, and 80+ division. They are also presented to the top five men and women in the push rim wheelchair division, the first man and woman in the wheelchair quad-class division and the top three men and women in the visually impaired division. Team awards are presented to the members of the first men’s and women’s open team and first men’s and women’s 40-and-over team.

A:

As principal sponsor, John Hancock Financial Services provided the first-ever prize money in 1986 and continues that tradition. The top finishers have received nearly $18.2 million in prize money and course-record bonuses over the past 30 years. To see a breakdown of the prize money that will be distributed, click the button below:

A:

The 13.1-mile, rolling course is an out-and-back route that runs along the Emerald Necklace park system.

  • The B.A.A. Half Marathon will begin and end at White Stadium in Boston’s Franklin Park. The park, one of the oldest in America, is located in Boston’s Jamaica Plain and Dorchester neighborhoods.
  • With a start on Pierpont Road, the course proceeds out of Franklin Park, over the Monsignor William Casey Overpass, and past the Arnold Arboretum and Jamaica Pond as The Arborway becomes The Jamaicaway.
  • The course then passes Willow Pond and Olmsted Park, before the turn-around-point on The Riverway 4.75 miles into the race.
  • On the return, runners hug the western side of the Emerald Necklace, with Leverett Pond, and Jamaica Pond now on the left.
  • The race re-enters Franklin Park and loops around animal enclosures in the Franklin Park Zoo, before finishing on the track in White Stadium.

For more information, and to view the course map (including an elevation chart), click the button below:

A:

Unfortunately, Boston Marathon bib numbers and entry fees cannot be refunded. Regrettably, we do not allow deferment of race entry to another year. Runner bib numbers cannot be transferred to another participant, and you may not give your number to someone else. The Boston Marathon is a top-level sporting competition, and the B.A.A. seeks to uphold the integrity of both its entrants list and field and the results and awards reports and rankings.

Refunds or deferments of bib numbers for the Boston Marathon will not be granted for any reason, including injury, pregnancy, military exercise or deployment, and family emergencies. We regret that we cannot make exceptions.

For active duty military deployments to war zones, deferment of qualifying times will be honored for a later race. However, there will be no refund or deferment of bib numbers or entry fee. The B.A.A. appreciates the understanding from all who ask this question of the race organization, and we appreciate the cooperation in upholding the policies that are in place.

A:

Historically, runners who beat their qualifying standard by a larger amount of time are more likely to be accepted into the Boston Marathon. Since our rolling registration procedure was introduced in 2012, a cutoff has occurred 3 times:

  • Due to the high volume of applicants in 2012, the acceptance cutoff was drawn at 74 seconds. 
  • In 2013, we were able to accept all qualified runners who registered during the qualified registration period, so there was no cutoff time. 
  • In 2014, the cutoff for qualifying times was drawn at those who beat their qualifying standard by 98 seconds or faster.
  • The cutoff for the 2015 Boston Marathon was drawn at 62 seconds. 

Although these were the cases for previous years, we cannot predict how competitive the registration process will be for any given year, or how quickly it will fill. If you don’t have a qualifying time but still wish to participate, you can apply to run of one of the B.A.A. official charities by contacting them directly. Click the button below for more information:

B.A.A. Moment 3

1966 - Bobbi Gibb

Although not an official entrant, Roberta “Bobbi” Gibb became the first woman to run the Boston Marathon. Joining the starting field shortly after the gun had been fired, Gibb finished the race in 3:21:40 to place 126th overall. Gibb again claimed the “unofficial” title in 1967 and 1968.