FAQ

Contact Info:
Boston Office (Administration)
185 Dartmouth Street
6th floor
Boston MA 02116
phone:617-236-1652
fax:617-236-4505
e-mail:info@baa.org
Hopkinton Office (Registration)
One Ash Street
Hopkinton MA 01748
phone:508-435-6905
fax:508-435-6590
e-mail:registration@baa.org

Frequently Asked Questions

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Yes, the event will engage the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USASA), in accordance with the international Standards of Doping Control, to test selected athletes who earn prize money. Athletes who participate in the B.A.A. Half Marathon may be subject to drug testing in accordance with the USADA Protocol for Olympic Movement Testing (USADA Protocol). USADA will be responsible for conducting comprehensive drug testing, as well as the adjudication of positive findings. Athletes with positive drug test results will have their cases adjudicated according to the USADA Protocol and will be penalized, if appropriate, according to applicable IAAF or World Anti Doping Agency rules. Such penalties may include, but not be limited to, a period of ineligibility from competition, as well as disqualification from past competitions and cancellation of awards and prizes previously awarded. Any substance taken by an athlete is at his/her own risk and may result in a positive sample. BEWARE: some nutritional supplements, prescription, cold medicines and over-the-counter medications contain prohibited substances. Information regarding specific drugs and substances may be obtained by calling the USADA Drug Reference Line at 1-800-233-0393, or by visiting www.usantidoping.org or www.888athlete.org.
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Unfortunately, Boston Marathon bib numbers and entry fees cannot be refunded. Regrettably, we do not allow deferment of race entry to another year. Runner bib numbers cannot be transferred to another participant, and you may not give your number to someone else. The Boston Marathon is a top-level sporting competition, and the B.A.A. seeks to uphold the integrity of both its entrants list and field and the results and awards reports and rankings.

Refunds or deferments of bib numbers for the Boston Marathon will not be granted for any reason, including injury, pregnancy, military exercise or deployment, and family emergencies. We regret that we cannot make exceptions.

For active duty military deployments to war zones, deferment of qualifying times will be honored for a later race. However, there will be no refund or deferment of bib numbers or entry fee. The B.A.A. appreciates the understanding from all who ask this question of the race organization, and we appreciate the cooperation in upholding the policies that are in place.

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Free shuttle services, the MBTA, and our drop-off/pick-up location are your best bet. There will be no parking at the event location. Parking in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood is extremely limited, but some spots along the street may be available. For more details on our transportation program, click the button below:

More Information - Click Here

 

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We STRONGLY recommend that all entrants take the official B.A.A. buses from Boston to Hopkinton on race morning, as it is the only way we can ensure that you will get into Hopkinton.

Hopkinton State Park parking and shuttle is for volunteers and spectators only. Registered runners parking at this location and using this shuttle will not be transported to the Athlete’s Village, will have to walk an additional one mile from the drop-off point to the Village, and may be subject to additional security screening to enter the Village. Registered runners are requested to use the shuttle buses from the South Street parking lots in order to ensure their arrival at the Athlete’s Village.

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JetBlue is the official airline for the Boston Marathon. To get special rates, please make your reservations through Marathon Tours. Email or call 800-444-4097, or 617-242-7845.
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The 13.1-mile, rolling course is an out-and-back route that runs along the Emerald Necklace park system.

  • The B.A.A. Half Marathon will begin and end at White Stadium in Boston’s Franklin Park. The park, one of the oldest in America, is located in Boston’s Jamaica Plain and Dorchester neighborhoods.
  • With a start on Pierpont Road, the course proceeds out of Franklin Park, over the Monsignor William Casey Overpass, and past the Arnold Arboretum and Jamaica Pond as The Arborway becomes The Jamaicaway.
  • The course then passes Willow Pond and Olmsted Park, before the turn-around-point on The Riverway 4.75 miles into the race.
  • On the return, runners hug the western side of the Emerald Necklace, with Leverett Pond, and Jamaica Pond now on the left.
  • The race re-enters Franklin Park and loops around animal enclosures in the Franklin Park Zoo, before finishing on the track in White Stadium.

For more information, and to view the course map (including an elevation chart), click the button below:

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The average temperature at the start of the Boston Marathon ranges from 45-50 degrees F. The spread of temperature throughout the race can average approximately 25 degrees F, meaning the finish line temperature can average from 70-75 degrees F. However, in years past, there have been examples of extreme weather at the Boston Marathon. See below for examples:

Snow

  • 1907 Traces of sleet
  • 1908 Snowflakes and drizzle
  • 1925 Cold wind and occasional snowflakes
  • 1961 Snow squalls driven by winds of 10–12 mph; recorded temperature was 39 degrees
  • 1967 Snow squalls accompanied the runners through the first five miles.

Driving Rain

  • 1970 Mix of rain and sleet; temperatures in the high 30s;
  • 2007 Rain; winds gusting 25-30 mph; temperatures in the mid 40s.

Extreme Heat or Unseasonable Warmth

  • 1905 The temperature was reported to have reached the 100-degree mark.
  • 1909 The temperature soared to 97 degrees.
  • 1915 Reports of “intense heat.”
  • 1927 With the temperature reaching 84 degrees, a newly surfaced, yet uncured, road melted under the runners’ shoes.
  • 1931 Reports of “terrific heat” that “spelled ruin to the hopes of countless ambitious runners.”
  • 1952 The temperature rose to the upper 80s, with a high of 88 degrees.
  • 1958 The temperature climbed to 84 degrees.
  • 1976 For much of the first half of the race, the temperature along the course was reported to be 96 degrees.
  • 1987 The temperature was in the mid/upper 80s and the humidity was more than 95 percent.
  • 2004 The hottest marathon since 1976 (86 degrees at the finish) caused a record number of heat-related illnesses.
  • 2012 The temperature reached 75 degrees by the start of the Women's Elite field (9:30 a.m.), with a high of 89 degrees reported in Framingham (10K mark) by mid-day.
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For qualifying information on the Boston Marathon, please click the button below:

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Qualifying information for Athletes with Disabilities wishing to compete in the the Boston Marathon can be found using the button below:

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The registration fee for the Boston Marathon for qualifiers is $180 USD for United States residents and $240 USD for international residents.

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