FAQ

Contact Info:
Boston Office (Administration)
185 Dartmouth Street
6th floor
Boston MA 02116
phone:617-236-1652
fax:617-236-4505
e-mail:info@baa.org
Hopkinton Office (Registration)
One Ash Street
Hopkinton MA 01748
phone:508-435-6905
fax:508-435-6590
e-mail:registration@baa.org

Frequently Asked Questions

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A:

Unfortunately, Boston Marathon bib numbers and entry fees cannot be refunded. Regrettably, we do not allow deferment of race entry to another year. Runner bib numbers cannot be transferred to another participant, and you may not give your number to someone else. The Boston Marathon is a top-level sporting competition, and the B.A.A. seeks to uphold the integrity of both its entrants list and field and the results and awards reports and rankings.

Refunds or deferments of bib numbers for the Boston Marathon will not be granted for any reason, including injury, pregnancy, military exercise or deployment, and family emergencies. We regret that we cannot make exceptions.

For active duty military deployments to war zones, deferment of qualifying times will be honored for a later race. However, there will be no refund or deferment of bib numbers or entry fee. The B.A.A. appreciates the understanding from all who ask this question of the race organization, and we appreciate the cooperation in upholding the policies that are in place.

A:
If your Number Pick Up Card does not reach you before race weekend, please be sure to bring a photo ID with you to Number Pick-Up at the John Hancock Sports and Fitness Expo located at the Hynes Convention Center. Go to the "Replacement Number Pick-Up Cards" booth near number pick-up, show your valid photo id, and a volunteer will print a new card for you. You will use that new card to pick up your number. We are requiring that all participants claim their own bib number at the John Hancock Sports & Fitness Expo during normal expo hours. Friends or family will not be allowed to claim your bib number for you.
A:

Historically, runners who beat their qualifying standard by a larger amount of time are more likely to be accepted into the Boston Marathon. Since our rolling registration procedure was introduced in 2012, a cutoff has occurred 3 times:

  • Due to the high volume of applicants in 2012, the acceptance cutoff was drawn at 74 seconds. 
  • In 2013, we were able to accept all qualified runners who registered during the qualified registration period, so there was no cutoff time. 
  • In 2014, the cutoff for qualifying times was drawn at those who beat their qualifying standard by 98 seconds or faster.
  • The cutoff for the 2015 Boston Marathon was drawn at 62 seconds. 

Although these were the cases for previous years, we cannot predict how competitive the registration process will be for any given year, or how quickly it will fill. If you don’t have a qualifying time but still wish to participate, you can apply to run of one of the B.A.A. official charities by contacting them directly. Click the button below for more information:

A:

The average temperature at the start of the Boston Marathon ranges from 45-50 degrees F. The spread of temperature throughout the race can average approximately 25 degrees F, meaning the finish line temperature can average from 70-75 degrees F. However, in years past, there have been examples of extreme weather at the Boston Marathon. See below for examples:

Snow

  • 1907 Traces of sleet
  • 1908 Snowflakes and drizzle
  • 1925 Cold wind and occasional snowflakes
  • 1961 Snow squalls driven by winds of 10–12 mph; recorded temperature was 39 degrees
  • 1967 Snow squalls accompanied the runners through the first five miles.

Driving Rain

  • 1970 Mix of rain and sleet; temperatures in the high 30s;
  • 2007 Rain; winds gusting 25-30 mph; temperatures in the mid 40s.

Extreme Heat or Unseasonable Warmth

  • 1905 The temperature was reported to have reached the 100-degree mark.
  • 1909 The temperature soared to 97 degrees.
  • 1915 Reports of “intense heat.”
  • 1927 With the temperature reaching 84 degrees, a newly surfaced, yet uncured, road melted under the runners’ shoes.
  • 1931 Reports of “terrific heat” that “spelled ruin to the hopes of countless ambitious runners.”
  • 1952 The temperature rose to the upper 80s, with a high of 88 degrees.
  • 1958 The temperature climbed to 84 degrees.
  • 1976 For much of the first half of the race, the temperature along the course was reported to be 96 degrees.
  • 1987 The temperature was in the mid/upper 80s and the humidity was more than 95 percent.
  • 2004 The hottest marathon since 1976 (86 degrees at the finish) caused a record number of heat-related illnesses.
  • 2012 The temperature reached 75 degrees by the start of the Women's Elite field (9:30 a.m.), with a high of 89 degrees reported in Framingham (10K mark) by mid-day.
B.A.A. Moment 3

1966 - Bobbi Gibb

Although not an official entrant, Roberta “Bobbi” Gibb became the first woman to run the Boston Marathon. Joining the starting field shortly after the gun had been fired, Gibb finished the race in 3:21:40 to place 126th overall. Gibb again claimed the “unofficial” title in 1967 and 1968.