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Event Information: Spectator Information

A few tips for your fans on race day

Follow your runners with AT&T Athlete Alerts!
By bringing its popular AT&T Athlete Alerts program to the B.A.A. Half Marathon, running fans who want to track the progress of their friends and family or their favorite elite runner can get updates sent to their mobile phone or email in real-time. For more information, click the button below:

Take the MBTA Orange Line to Forest Hills.
At the Forest Hills Rotary near the Shattuck Hospital, spectators will be able to see the race three times.

Parking in the nearby neighborhood
Parking within Franklin Park is prohibited on race day, and parking in Boston is never easy. If spectators choose to park their cars around the Franklin Park area, please follow these four tips:

  • Pay close attention to the street signs.
  • The earlier they choose to park, the better their odds are of finding a good spot.
  • Cars cannot be parked on any part of the race course.
  • Plan to park approximately .25 miles from the course and walk to the course.
  • Do not expect to be able to move a vehicle until after the last participant clears the course and the road is reopened to vehicular traffic.

Take the "T" (Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority)
The following MBTA stations (and the lines which they are on) are near the B.A.A. Half Marathon course:

0.9 mile mark  Forest Hills (Orange Line)
3.5 mile mark Heath Street (Green Line - E Train)
3.75 mile mark  Riverway Station (Green Line - E Train)
4.5 mile mark  Fenway Station (Green Line - D Train)
5.0 mile mark  Longwood Station (Green Line - D Train)
6.0 mile mark Heath Street or Riverway Station (Green Line - E Train
8.8 mile mark  Forest Hills (Orange Line)


If you are planning to come to the event on a bicycle or with a stroller, please do not lock these items anywhere along the course where they may impede runner traffic. Bike racks will be available on race day. They will be located near the start corrals and will be identified with bike parking signs.

Please ask your friends and family who may accompany you to stay off the course at all times, and be mindful of vehicular traffic around the course. Please cooperate with law enforcement personnel, if asked.

B.A.A. Moment 3

1966 - Bobbi Gibb

Although not an official entrant, Roberta “Bobbi” Gibb became the first woman to run the Boston Marathon. Joining the starting field shortly after the gun had been fired, Gibb finished the race in 3:21:40 to place 126th overall. Gibb again claimed the “unofficial” title in 1967 and 1968.